Family History

Spotlight on Individual Family Members

The name “Gallup” appears many times throughout history, from the settling of various parts of the United States to decorated military veterans or those who have performed what might be termed heroic sacrifice. Did you know that a Gallup is credited with creating the modern city of New York? Or that both Presidents Bush can trace their ancestries to the Gallup lineage? Following are just a few of the most notable Gallup family members...

John Gallop

The patriarch of the Gallup family is John Gallop. John Gallop was documented to have arrived in this country on the “Mary & John”. He left England on March 20, 1630, and arrived in Boston where he settled and became one of the first grantees of land in the northern part of town. John Gallop had a wharf and house, and the area was known as Gallop’s Point. Gallop was very important to the development of trade between the Massachusetts Colony and Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Christobel Bruschett

John Gallop’s wife, Christobel Bruschett did not travel with her husband to Boston. She stayed behind with their four children: John b. abt 1615, Joan b. abt 1618, William b. abt 1622, Nathaniel & Samuel b. abt 16 Aug 1629 (this is a baptism date). They had one other daughter, Frances, who died at a young age. Christobel was the daughter of Edmund Bruschett and Emma Nichols and was probably born in the 1590’s in Dorset, England. Christobel did not want to travel to the Boston... and her husband was ready to return to England. John Gallop had become an important member of the colony and Gov. Winthrop was eager to keep him in America. Gov. Winthrop wrote Rev. John White in Dorchester, England:

I have much difficultye to keep John Gallop here by reason of his wife will not come. I marvayle at the woman’s weaknesse. I pray pursuade her and further her coming by all means. If she will come, let her have the remainder of his wages; if not, let it be bestowed to bring over his childre, if so he desires. It would be about 40 pounds losse to him to come for her.

Your assured in the Lord’s worke,
Massachusetts, July 4, 1632
J. Winthrop

Christobel was apparently persuaded and landed in Boston harbor on the ship “Griffin” on 4 Sept, 1633. John Gallop, himself, piloted the ship through the harbor through a new channel that he had discovered.

Andrew Gallup

Andrew Gallup was an artilleryman at the massacre at Fort Griswold, Sept 6, 1781. While working his gun before the capture of the fort, he was struck by a musket ball coming through the embrasure, passing through his hip. He was soon taken away from his post at the gun, and laid helpless on the ground out of the way, facing the north gate, and saw while lying thus the enemy rush in through the gateway, and heard the shout of the British officer at the head of the advancing column: “Who commands this post!” and the reply of Col. Ledyard, as he advanced to meet him, handing him his sword: “I did, but you do now.” The officer took the sword, and infuriated by the unexpected slaughter, immediately plunged it into Ledyard’s breast. Afterward Andrew was stabbed with a bayonet as he lay helpless on the ground, the point striking a rib glanced to one side, making a long though not a deep wound, leaving a large scar; he was also stabbed in the arm. He was one of the wounded soldiers who were put in a cart and sent rolling down the hill. Possessing a strong and vigorous constitution, he recovered form his wounds. After the war he settled in Groton as a farmer. (From Gallup Genealogy, 1966)

Robert Gallup

Robert Gallup was severely wounded at Battle of Groton Heights, Sept 6, 1781; twice by a bayonet and felled by the blow of a musket, breaking his hip and rendering him insensible. He was found in this condition the next morning by his mother who went to to the Fort searching for him. He eventually recovered and was one of the first settlers in Plymouth, NY. (From Gallup Genealogy, 1966)

Andrew H. Green

Andrew Haswell Green (1820-1903) had an illustrious career in New York City. Among other things, he is credited with creating the modern city of New York by bringing together the five formerly independent boroughs into one city. He also commissioned Frederick Law Olmstead, the renowned landscape architect, to create Central Park and Prospect Park. He was also responsible for building the Metropolitan Museum and the Museum of Natural History.

Each year a ceremony is held to honor this unsung master planner, reformer and preservationist. In November 2007, our association president Bill Pearson was one of the speakers at the tribute.

Click here to read the 2007 coverage in New York Magazine.
Click here to see a photo gallery of the 2007 ceremony.
To learn more about Andrew H. Green, visit www.andrewhgreen.net.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

Emily Dickinson (December 10, 1830 - May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. After being schooled at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she spent a short time at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before retiring to her family’s house, the Homestead. Throughout her adult life she rarely traveled outside of Amherst or very far from home. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence.

Dickinson was a prolific private poet, choosing to publish fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson’s poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often utilize slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation. Her poems also tend to deal with themes of death and immortality, two subjects which infused her letters to friends.

Although most of her acquaintances were probably aware of Dickinson’s writing, it was not until after her death in 1886 — when Lavinia, Emily’s younger sister, discovered her cache of poems — that the breadth of Dickinson’s work became apparent. Her first collection of poetry was published in 1890 by personal acquaintances Thomas Wentworth Higginson and Mabel Loomis Todd, both of whom heavily edited the content. A complete and mostly unaltered collection of her poetry became available for the first time in 1955 when The Poems of Emily Dickinson was published by scholar Thomas H. Johnson. Despite unfavorable reviews and skepticism of her literary prowess during the late 19th and early 20th century, critics now consider Dickinson to be a major American poet. (from Wikipedia.org)

Thanks to Jeff Guy for this submission. Lineage:

John Gallop m. Christobel Bruschett
John Gallup m. Hannah Lake
Peter Crary m. Christobel Gallup
John Crary m. Prudence Hayward
Prudence Crary m. Eleazur Fairbanks
Sarah Fairbanks m. Jude Fay
Betsey Fay m. Joel Norcross
Emily Norcross m Edward Dickinson
Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

David Leeds Gallup

Gallup, New Mexico was named for D.L. Gallup. He was born in Mystic, CT in 1842. An excerpt from the Santa Fe Magazine of March 1942 calls D.L. Gallup the “grand old man” of the Santa Fe and controller of the system for twenty-three years. He died on February 9, 1924 in New York City. Mr. Gallup was in his eighty-second year and was one of the best known men in the New York railroad financial and banking district. He was survived by two daughters, Mrs. George S. Scott and Miss Agnes Gallup.

Lineage:

John Gallop m. Christobel Bruschett
John Gallup m. Hannah Lake
Benadam Gallup m. Hester Prentice
Lieut. Benadam Gallup m. Eunice Cobb
Col. Benadam Gallup III m. Hannah Avery
Isaac Gallup m. Anna Smith
Russell Gallup m. Hannah Morgan
Edwin Russell Gallup m. Eliza Ann Leeds
David Leeds Gallup m. Fanny Smith Noyes

George Horace Gallup

George Horace Gallup (November 18, 1901 - July 26, 1984), American statistician and inventor of the Gallup poll, a successful statistical method of survey sampling for measuring public opinion.

Gallup was born into a dairy farming family in Jefferson, Iowa. He entered the University of Iowa in 1918, and earned a B.A. (1923), M.A. (1925), and Ph.D. in political science (1928) there. While at Iowa, Gallup served as editor of the student newspaper, The Daily Iowan. His doctoral dissertation was entitled A New Technique for Objective Methods for Measuring Reader Interest in Newspapers. After teaching at Iowa, he left in 1929 to head the school of journalism at Drake University, leaving there in 1931 to teach and do research at Northwestern University. One year later he joined Young & Rubicam (Y&R), an advertising agency, where he conducted public opinion surveys for its clients and became that industry’s first market research director. He remained with Y&R for sixteen years. While still at Y&R, he founded the American Institute of Public Opinion in 1935.

In 1936, his new organization achieved national recognition by correctly predicting, from the replies of only 5,000 respondents, the result of that year’s presidential election, in contradiction to the widely respected Literary Digest magazine whose much more extensive poll based on over two million returned questionnaires got the result wrong. Not only did he get the election right, he correctly predicted the results of the Literary Digest poll as well using a random sample smaller than theirs but chosen to match it.

Twelve years later, his organization had its moment of greatest ignominy, when it predicted that Thomas Dewey would defeat Harry S. Truman in the 1948 election, by five to 15 percentage points. Gallup believed the error was mostly due to ending his polling three weeks before Election Day.

In 1958, Gallup grouped all of his polling operations under what became The Gallup Organization. (from Wikipedia.org)

Lineage:

John Gallop m. Christobel Bruschett
John Gallup m. Hannah Lake
John Gallup III m. Elizabeth Harris & Benadam Gallup & Hester Prentice
John Gallup IV m. Elizabeth Wheeler & Nathaniel Gallup* m. Margaret Gallup
Issac Gallup m. Margaret Gallup & Benjamin Gallup** & Amy Kinne
William Gallup m. Amy Gallup
Nelson Gallup m. Betsey Tanner
John Nelson Gallup m. Happy Kinney Church
George Henry Gallup m. Nettie Quella Davenport
George Horace Gallup m. Ophelia Smith Miller

*Nathaniel Gallup was the son of John Gallup III... also a brother of John Gallup IV.

**Benjamin Gallup and Margaret Gallup (parents of William & Amy Gallup) were both the children of Nathaniel Gallup & Margaret Gallup.... now isn’t that confusing?

President George H. W. Bush

George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) served as the forty-first President of the United States from 1989 to 1993. Bush held a multitude of political positions prior to his presidency, including Vice President of the United States in the administration of Ronald Reagan (1981-1989) and director of the CIA. Bush is the father of George W. Bush, the 43rd President of the United States, and Jeb Bush, former Governor of Florida. (from Wikipedia.org)

Lineage:

John Gallop m. Christobel Bruschett
John Gallup m. Hannah Lake
Elizabeth Gallup m. Henry Stephens
Henry Stephens, Jr. m. Elizabeth Fellows
Lucy Stephens m. Ephraim Smith
Sanford Smith m. Priscilla Whipple
Harriet Smith m. Obadiah Newcomb Bush
James Smith Bush m. Harriet Eleanor Fay
Samuel Prescott Bush m. Flora Sheldon
Prescott Sheldon Bush m. Dorothy Walker
Pres. George Herbert Walker Bush m. Barbara Pierce

President George W. Bush

George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third President of the United States of America. He previously served as the forty-sixth Governor of Texas from 1995 to 2000 and is the eldest son of former United States President George Herbert Walker Bush and Barbara Bush. He was inaugurated as president on January 20, 2001 and his current term is scheduled to end at noon on January 20, 2009. (from Wikipedia.org)

Lineage:

John Gallop m. Christobel Bruschett
John Gallup m. Hannah Lake
Elizabeth Gallup m. Henry Stephens
Henry Stephens, Jr. m. Elizabeth Fellows
Lucy Stephens m. Ephraim Smith
Sanford Smith m. Priscilla Whipple
Harriet Smith m. Obadiah Newcomb Bush
James Smith Bush m. Harriet Eleanor Fay
Samuel Prescott Bush m. Flora Sheldon
Prescott Sheldon Bush m. Dorothy Walker
Pres. George Herbert Walker Bush m. Barbara Pierce
Pres. George Walker Bush m. Laura Welch


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